This week, I talk about newsletters, including links to some of my favorites, tips for consuming newsletters, and resources for creating your own newsletter.

I'm Eric Gregorich. Mind Nodes is a weekly newsletter where I share my latest posts and interesting articles, videos, and other content that I discover throughout the week.

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📰 New This Week

I was going to start by saying, "It's been a busy week," but I'm really trying to stop saying the word busy. Although I worked almost 60 hours this week building a complicated application for a client, I enjoyed doing the work. I was also able to focus with minimal distractions. I think the work that makes us feel "busy" is when we're bombarded with incoming requests and jumping around putting out fires. Yes, this was a good week.

Anyway, I thought I would share a few helpful newsletters that I have been following and provide some tips for consuming and even creating newsletters. We have ourselves a "theme" this week. Let me know what you think.


🙇 Interesting Newsletters

Newsletters seem to be making a comeback these days. I'm not talking about the email you receive from marketers chalked full of promotions and click-bate links. I'm speaking of good quality content delivered directly to your email.

I started subscribing to some high-quality newsletters a couple months ago. Here are a few that have stuck.

Ness Labs Maker Mind
Neuroscience-based strategies towards mindful productivity.

Mark Manson's Mindf*ck Mondays
A refreshing take on productivity, philosophy, personal value, and much more.

Plan Your Next
Nate Kadlac talks about design, creativity, and how to prepare for your next thing.

Adventures In Life
Coach Willis creates one atomic essay each weekday containing something inspiring.

reddy2Go
reddy2Go sends a daily dose of playful but thoughtful topics that make you think.

James Clear
James Clear sends a short weekly newsletter containing a couple of tips (usually about habits), some quotes, and an occasional article.

For The Interested
A weekly newsletter featuring ideas to product, promote, and profit from online content.

David Perell's Monday Musings and Friday Finds
David sends a weekly newsletter containing a summary of interesting content that he discovers.


🍴 Tips for Consuming Newsletters

Before newsletters, I would subscribe to content using RSS. Fortunately, if you prefer to not add anything new to your email vortex, several options give you the best of both worlds.

MailBrew

MailBrew is a service that lets you build your own digest of content from various sources, including RSS, Twitter, YouTube, Hacker News, and much more. You can schedule these digests to be emailed to you, or you can just open the app and view the latest digests at your convenience. MailBrew also provides you a unique email address that you can use to send your newsletters directly to the app.

RSS Readers

More traditional RSS Readers, such as Feedly and Inoreader, have added the ability to add your newsletters together with your other RSS content. They also provide you a unique email to use for your subscriptions.

Disposable Email

Here is another helpful tip. You can create a disposable email address in Gmail that gives you a unique email address that you can use for newsletters. In Gmail, you can add a + to the end of your email address, but before the @ to create an entirely new email address for yourself. For example, 'myemailaddress+newsletter@gmail.com' or 'myemailaddress+junk@gmail.com'. Any email sent to this address will go to your inbox as usual, but now you can easily set up a filter that adds a tag or even forwards the email to another service, like MailBrew).


✍ Writing Newsletters

Why write a newsletter?

A newsletter has one unique advantage over a blog or website. People subscribe to a newsletter because they are interested in a more personal connection with you. They are providing their email address in exchange for content that will, hopefully, help solve some of their problems or keep them entertained. You then accumulate a list of email addresses of people who have a connection with you. Unlike followers on social networks, like Twitter and Instagram, you can take this list of followers to any platform since you own it.

Resources for starting your own newsletter

As you can probably tell, I'm no expert at writing newsletters. If you want to write your own newsletter and understand how to gain an audience, distribute content,  build a platform, manage SEO, and much more, I highly recommend Steph Smith's book Doing Content Right. Fortunately for me, I got this book when it was only $20. The price keeps going up with more demand.

Here is a helpful article by that covers many common questions about creating a newsletter.

Getting Started

Maybe someday I'll provide my own tips for writing newsletters. For now, I suggest you just get started. There are free services like Substack and Revue by Twitter that simply let you create an account and start writing. If you want more control of your content, you can use Ghost (my site is hosted on Ghost), WordPress, WebFlow, or dozens of other hosting services. ConvertKit or Mailchimp are excellent services for sending email and managing email campaigns.


📚 What I'm Reading

Unfortunately, I just haven't read much this week. I'm still working on these two books.

Designing the Mind: The Principles of Psychitecture - Ryan A Bush
A book about overcoming your biases, and understanding how your mind works so that you can design it to work the way you want.

The Software Architect Elevator- Gregor Hohpe
A book about the soft-skills of software architects.


🗺 Explore by Topic

Productivity
How to use technology to make us better at what we do and how we can step away from technology altogether and focus on mindful productivity.

Personal Knowledge Management
Articles that talk about PKM and how to build your own using various techniques and tools, including Zettelkasten, Obsidian, and more.

Book Summaries
I summarize the books that I have read. I usually read about productivity, software architecture, leadership and occasionally explore something new.

Microsoft
Various content centered around Microsoft products and services. Includes Power Apps, Power Automate, SharePoint, and more.


If you enjoyed this newsletter, please share it with others. You can also reach me on Twitter @ericgregorich or send me an email if you have any questions or suggestions.

Feature Photo by Brett Jordan